Facile

Monday, October 26, 2015

Conservative Evangelicals May Want to Ask Dr. Ben Carson, a 7th Day Advenstist cultic church, whether he thinks they're going to hell.

Conservative Evangelicals May Want to Ask Dr. Ben Carson, a 7th Day Adventist (cult) church, whether he thinks they're going to hell. I mean, if you don't attend church on certain days or observe specific rituals, for lack of better word, you're damned. But Obama, according to conservatives is a Muslim, and even if they were correct (which they aren't) doesn't have the same view of Americans as does Ben Carson. He, Carson, lied about the robbery at a food establishment or grossly overstated the nature of the gun being pressed into his back. When asked if Ben was armed, he responded "no, of course not." But the comment completely contradicts his earlier rhetoric that everyone should be armed all the time. He went so far as to say the Oregon shooting massacre victims should have rushed the gunmen, which isn't a natural response when being shot at. Of course, 7th Day Adventist believes the world was created in 6 literal days and there is no room for nuance. I have to wonder if these people actually believe the earth is 6,000 years old. Whether God created the earth in 6 literal days or by the process I call theist evolution. Makes no difference as he is the creator. Please read my articles on Theistic Evolution for context into that subject.

But conservative evangelical Christians should ask themselves a few questions about Ben Carson's faith before falling head over heels for him. "Fundamentalist religions tend to cast their way as the only way. That's the nature of such churches. It is not a huge surprise that Seventh-day Adventists say non-believers will be screwed in the End Times. Yet true-believing Seventh-day Adventists take a dim view of other Christian religions and hold what is essentially a dark conspiracy theory: that the government will target them for imprisonment and, possibly, execution. Journalists and partisans are often reluctant to discuss the religious beliefs of candidates—though that has not been true in the case of Barack Obama. (Sincere Christian or secret Muslim?) And days ago, Trump, in typically crude fashion, did question Carson's religion, saying, "I'm Presbyterian. Boy, that's down the middle of the road, folks, in all fairness. I mean, Seventh-day Adventist, I don't know about. I just don't know about." Given that Carson is aiming to obtain control of the executive branch of the US government, his views regarding other Christians, the nearness of the End Times, and the Satanic Sabbath persecution conspiracy may well be relevant. (After all, if he shares his church's belief that the end of time is soon, does he have any reason to care about climate change?) Moreover, evangelical voters flocking to Carson's campaign might be interested to know whether he does perceive their churches as foot soldiers for the Antichrist. (1)."

So, evangelicals believing voting for Christian with wild beliefs that alter from mainstream Christian ideology/doctrine is a bad idea. Cite 1). David Corn. (36 October 2015). Does Ben Carson Believe Most Evangelical Voters Are Going to Hell? Why social conservatives supporting Carson's 2016 campaign may want to ask him a few questions. Mother Jones. Why social conservatives supporting Carson's 2016 campaign may want to ask him a few questions.

No comments:

Post a Comment